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CLARIN ERIC is happy to announce the 6th CLARIN Annual Conference and invites submission of papers.

LOCATION

The 6th CLARIN Annual Conference will be held in Budapest, Hungary.

IMPORTANT DATES (2017)

1st February First call published and submission system open
1st May Submission deadline
24th June Notification of acceptance
1st September Final version of extended abstracts due
18th – 20th September CLARIN Annual Conference

 

CONFERENCE AIMS

The CLARIN Annual Conference is organised for the Humanities and Social Sciences community in order to exchange ideas and experiences on the CLARIN infrastructure. This includes its design, construction and operation, the data and services that it contains or should contain, its actual use by researchers, its relation to other infrastructures and projects, and the CLARIN Knowledge Sharing Infrastructure.

CONFERENCE TOPICS

Operation and use

Operation and use of the CLARIN infrastructure, e.g.

  • Use of the CLARIN infrastructure in humanities research, including needs for updated and new functionality
  • Usability studies and evaluations of CLARIN services
  • Analysis of the CLARIN infrastructure usage, identification of user audience and impact studies
  • Showcases and demonstrators
  • Models for the sustainability of the infrastructure, including issues in curation, migration, evolution, financing and cooperation
  • Legal and ethical issues in operating the infrastructure

THEMATIC SESSION: Multilingual Processing for Humanities and Social Sciences

The Humanities and Social Sciences (H&SS) have formulated research questions pertaining to different languages. However, the number of research tasks in H&SS in which Language Technology has been applied to cross-language barriers and analyse the same phenomena on material expressed in different languages is relatively small. The situation is better in the case genuine linguistic research, but in multilingual research applications in H&SS are mostly based on a kind of ‘bag of words’ model, and very rarely utilise more advanced multilingual Language Technology methods.

The general aim of this thematic session is to present examples of multilingual approaches in H&SS research related to CLARIN, and to discuss infrastructural solutions to the problem of multilingual interoperability of the Language Technology that are necessary for more advanced research in H&SS. We expect to organise presentations and discussions during the session on the following aspects:

  1. Examples of applications of Language Technology to multilingual processing for the needs of research in H&SS.
  2. Research tasks and ongoing projects in H&SS on the basis of multilingual material and application of Language Technology.
  3. Interoperability of language resources and tools for the needs of multilingual applications in H&SS: models for linking, standards and formats, mapping and linking algorithms, complex processing methods, architectures and platforms.

We invite submissions describing CLARIN related work addressing these aspects. Submissions (for oral presentations, posters, or demos) intended for the thematic session should be marked as such, and will be evaluated with respect to their appropriateness for the theme, in addition to the general acceptance criteria listed below.

PROGRAM

The scientific program both of the general sessions and the thematic session will include oral presentations, posters, and demos. There is no difference in quality between oral and poster presentations. Only the appropriateness of the type of communication (more or less interactive) to the content of the paper will be considered.

Submissions

SUBMISSIONS

Submission of proposals for oral presentations, poster presentations and/or demos must be extended abstracts (length: up to four A4 pages including references) in PDF format, in accordance with the template provided on the website.

It is not required that the authors are or have been directly involved in national or international CLARIN projects, but their work must be clearly related to the CLARIN activities, resources, tools or services.

Extended abstracts must be submitted through the EasyChair submission system (link) and will be reviewed by the program committee.

All proposals will be reviewed on the basis of both individual criteria and global criteria. The latter include thematic, linguistic and geographical spread. Individual acceptance criteria are the following:

  • Appropriateness: the contribution must pertain to the CLARIN infrastructure (e.g. use CLARIN, contribute to the CLARIN design, construction, operation, exploitation, etc.). In addition, submissions to the thematic session will be selected on the basis of their appropriateness to the theme.
  • Soundness and correctness: the content must be technically and factually correct and methods must be scientifically sound, according to best practice, and preferably evaluated.
  • Meaningful comparison: the abstract must indicate that the author is aware of alternative approaches, if any, and highlight relevant differences.
  • Substance: concrete work and experiences will be preferred over ideas and plans.
  • Impact: contributions with a higher impact on the research community and society at large will be preferred over papers with lower impact.
  • Clarity: the extended abstract must be informative, clear and understandable for the CLARIN audience.
  • Timeliness and novelty: the work must convey relevant new knowledge to the audience at this event.

Proceedings

PROCEEDINGS

If the submission is accepted, it will be published (possibly in revised form) in the conference Book of Abstracts. After the conference, the author(s) will be invited to submit a full paper (max. 12 pages) to be reviewed according to the same criteria as the abstracts. Accepted full papers will be digitally published in a conference proceedings volume at Linköping University Electronic Press within about 6 months after the conference.

Conference Program Committee

CONFERENCE PROGRAM COMMITTEE

The program committee for the conference consists of the following members:

  • Jan Theo Bakker, Dutch Language Union, The Netherlands/Flanders
  • Lars Borin, University of Gothenburg, Sweden
  • António Branco, University of Lisbon, Portugal
  • Koenraad De Smedt, University of Bergen, Norway
  • Tomaž Erjavec, Jožef Stefan Institute, Slovenia
  • Eva Hajičová, Charles University Prague, Czech Republic
  • Erhard Hinrichs, University of Tübingen, Germany
  • Krister Lindén, University of Helsinki, Finland
  • Bente Maegaard, University of Copenhagen, Denmark
  • Monica Monachini, Institute for Computational Linguistics «A. Zampolli», Italy
  • Karlheinz Mörth, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Austria
  • Jan Odijk, Utrecht University, the Netherlands
  • Maciej Piasecki, Wrocław University of Science and Technology, Poland (chair)
  • Stelios Piperidis, ILSP, Athena Research Center, Greece
  • Kiril Simov, IICT, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Bulgaria
  • Inguna Skadiņa, University of Latvia, Latvia
  • Jurgita Vaičenonienė, Vytautas Magnus University, Lithuania
  • Tamás Váradi, Research Institute for Linguistics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences
  • Kadri Vider, University of Tartu, Estonia
  • Martin Wynne, University of Oxford, UK

 

RSS

What Radboud Spring School 2017: Digital Humanities
Date 29 - 31 March 2017
Location Radboud campus in Nijmegen

This spring school at Radboud University offers courses into several widely-used techniques and tools in Digital Humanities.

The Spring School will be given in two parallel strands. The first strand of will contain a three days fulltime basic Python course. Python is widely used within many scientific domains and the most popular choice within eHumanities. The only way to learn programming is by doing and therefore a large part of this 3-day course is spent on putting your new skills into practice.

In the parallel strand the other topics will be taught in courses of one day or a half day. These courses focus on advanced Python programming skills (addressing machine learning), social network analysis and visualisation, oral history and working with speech recordings, and much more.

Participants of the three days' basic Python course therefore cannot participate in courses in the second strand.

The courses are targeted towards both junior and senior humanities researchers, including research master students, PhD students and postdocs. The courses are very practical and focussed on the development of personal digital skills.

Time and Location

The spring school takes place at the Radboud campus in Nijmegen, and will be held on 29-30-31 of March 2017. Participants are free to register for every course separately, as some courses take half a day, while the basic programming course takes 3 full days.

This school is open for both Dutch and International participants, and no previous knowledge of programming or certain tools is required but you do need to bring your own laptop. There is a limit on the number of available places for each of the courses (maximum of 30 people). Deadline for registration is March 8. For more information and registration see  the RSS-website.

The ILLC is looking to fill a position for a Data research analyst and a Ontology specialist (‘Semantic Lead’) within the project Golden Agents: Creative Industries and the Making of the Dutch Golden Age. This is a 5-year NWO Groot project (2017-2021) funded by the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO), and carried out by a consortium consisting of a large number of universities, research institutes and national cultural heritage institutions such as the Rijksmuseum, the National Library of the Netherlands and the Netherlands Institute for History of Art.

 

Data research analyst

The Data research analyst works in principle within Workpackage 1 (Meta)data and RDF representations), in a team led by Gertjan Filarski at Huygens ING (Amsterdam). The team includes specialists based at the Amsterdam City Archives, in particular a data curator and a typologist, and at VU University (advisor: Rinke Hoekstra, Computer Science, Knowledge Representation group). The Data research analyst will be formally employed at the University of Amsterdam and, for optimal cooperation, logistically hosted in the centre of Amsterdam close to the team led by Arianna Betti (Philosophy, Workpackage 2 leader & Head of Concepts in Motion Group at University of Amsterdam, as well as at a walking distance both to the City Archives and Huygens ING. The tasks of the Data research analyst are:

  • design and manage a pipeline to process and transform indexes, and semi-automated generated unstructured data from one specific database to the linked data infrastructure; the database in question is Golden Agent’s largest, the collection of notary acts from the City Archives of Amsterdam (Stadsarchief);
  • collaborate closely with the developers of ontologies working inside and outside the City Archives (Stadsarchief) in the Golden Agents project, in particular with the Semantic Lead in Workpackage 2 and other ICT specialists in Workpackage 1;
  • collaborate with the Workpackage 4 (dissemination) team led by Charles van der Heuvel (Main Leader of the Golden Agents project) and contribute to papers, reports, and proper documentation for software releases.

The appointment is for one year with the possibility of extension for a further three years. The position announced in this call is based in Amsterdam. We plan to host the position at the Department of Philosophy, and embed them in the Institute for Logic, Language and Computation (ILLC).

More info see here.

Ontology specialist

The ILLC is looking to fill a position for an Ontology specialist (‘Semantic Lead’) within the project Golden Agents: Creative Industries and the Making of the Dutch Golden Age. This is a 5-year NWO Groot project (2017-2021) funded by the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO), and carried out by a consortium consisting of a large number of universities, research institutes and national cultural heritage institutions such as the Rijksmuseum, the National Library of the Netherlands and the Netherlands Institute for History of Art.

The Semantic Lead works within Workpackage 2 (WP2, Ontologies and Scenarios), in a team led by Arianna Betti (Philosophy, WP2 leader & Head of Concepts in Motion Group at University of Amsterdam, and advised by Rinke Hoekstra (Computer Science, Knowledge Representation group at VU University). The WP2 team based at UvA is hosted in the centre of Amsterdam and will include a Scenario Specialist Multi Agent Technology and a RDF Representation Specialist.

The Semantic Lead will play a pivotal role in Golden Agents as he/she is expected to:

  • design an effective, sustainable and sensibly implementable (ontology-based) conceptual architecture common to the whole infrastructure. The common ontology is such as to enable multi-perspective, cross-disciplinary and comprehensive front-end queries across all databases relying on multi-agent systems at back-end. At the end of the project, users are able to rely on these queries to analyze, in a scholarly non-trivial way, the interactions between producers and consumers of the different forms of art of the Dutch Golden Age.

To achieve this goal, subtasks will be:

  • achieve a deep understanding of the ‘conceptual scheme’ or knowledge structures informally presupposed by the users (scholars in humanities) involved in the project, who will provide (kinds of) research questions embedded in user scenarios; extract any additional relevant and useful knowledge from the users;
  • formalise the informal knowledge thus extracted in domain-specific ontologies;
  • design the (ontology-based) conceptual architecture common to the whole infrastructure in such a way that (1) CLARIAH tools and standards are re-used and complied with; (2) the domain-specific ontologies are subsumed under the overarching ontology; (3) the whole ontological setup serves as the general reasoning architecture that the multi-agent systems will rely on to answer user queries;
  • collaborate closely with scientific programmers and advisors from all WPs on actually and effectively implementing the (ontology-based) conceptual architecture.

The work will be organised around regular work meetings with all (groups) of partners, i.e. the users in the ontology (Workpackage 2) team, the data representation (Workpackage 1) team led by Gertjan Filarski at Huygens ING (Amsterdam), which includes specialists based at the Amsterdam City Archives, and the multi-agent system (Workpackage 3) team led by Mehdi Dastani in Utrecht. The Semantic Lead is also expected to collaborate with the dissemination package (Workpackage 4) led by Charles van der Heuvel (Main Leader of the Golden Agents project) and contribute to papers, reports, and write up proper documentation for software releases.

The appointment is for one year with the possibility of extension up to a further three years. The position is based in Amsterdam and planned to be hosted at the Department of Philosophy, and embed them in the Institute for Logic, Language and Computation (ILLC).

More info see here.

logo dh2017 beneluxThe 4th DHBenelux conference will take place in Utrecht from Monday 3 to Wednesday 5 July 2017. The conference will be hosted by Utrecht University and is open to everyone, including researchers from outside the Benelux.

The DHBenelux conference aims to disseminate digital humanities projects in Belgium, the Netherlands and Luxemburg, and foster collaboration between them. The conference serves as a platform for DH researchers and offers an opportunity for members of the DH community to meet, present research, demonstrate tools, and discuss projects. More information can be found on our website.

The full "Call for Proposals" can be found here.

Arjan van Hessen, General Chair

Joris van Eijnatten, Programme Chair

 

The Faculty of Humanities and the Leiden University Centre for Digital Humanities (LUCDH) are looking for a:

Project description

Candidates should have relevant domain expertise and will be trained in data scientific methods. You will carry out research at the Faculty of Humanities and the Leiden Centre Data Science, with intensive interaction with other PhD candidates through joint research and participation in training modules, workshops, and summer schools. Each PhD student will be jobssupervised by a domain expert from the Humanities Faculty and a data scientist.

Project 1

Exploring new methods in comparing sign language corpora: analysing cross-linguistic variation in the lexicon (dr. Victoria Nyst).
The candidate should have an MA in corpus and/or computational linguistics, with emphasis on collection and organization of lexical databases;
Familiarity with Python and Java (and Django) will be an asset, as well as familiarity with automated image analysis;
A basic command of a sign language or the willingness to acquire this is requested;
As some of the corpora are annotated in French, a basic knowledge of French is helpful.

Project 2

Detecting cross-linguistic Syntactic Differences Automatically (DeSDA) (prof. Sjef Barbiers).
The candidate should have an MA in computational linguistics, artificial intelligence or equivalent, with affinity to the research field of comparative syntax of natural language;

You should have familiarity with POS-tagging, parsing and data mining tools and be able to adapt these to the needs of the project, using programming languages, software packages and standards such as Java, C++, XML, PHP, Python, R, SQL and RDF.