Accelerating Scientific Discovery Symposium

3rd National eScience Symposium
8 October 2015, Amsterdam ArenA

www.eScienceCenter.nl/symposium2015
*This event is free to attend, but registration is required*

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The grand societal challenges of the coming years, such as climate change, increased population size and aging, resource scarcity and increased urbanization require innovative scientific and technological interventions. One of the most important single factors in addressing these goals and revolutionizing scientific practice will be increased capacity to harness the power of computing technology. 

The 3rd National eScience Symposium will introduce scientists and researchers from all disciplines to digital technologies relevant to their field. The symposium will showcase world-class data-driven and compute-intensive research and include the presentation of the Netherlands Young eScienctist of the Year Award.

 

Plenary Keynotes

 
We are proud to announce the keynotes of the 3rd National eScience Symposium - Accelerating Scientific Discovery.

Prof. José van Dijck (tentative) is the newly appointed president of The Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences (KNAW). She is also a new media author and professor of Comparative Media Studies and former dean of the University of Amsterdam. She is the author of the recent books, Mediated Memory in the Digital Age and The Culture of Connectivity.

Prof. Leonard Smith is director of the Center for the Analysis of Time Series at the LSE. In recognition of his contributions to mathematically-coherent user-relevant developments in meteorology, the Royal Meteorological Society awarded Professor Smith its Fitzroy Prize in 2003. Professor Smith is currently a member of the ASA Advisory Committee on Climate Change Policy (ACCCP) and a member of the Smith Institute's Scientific Committee.

Prof. Tony Hey After a long and distinguished career in physics and computing, in both academia and industry, Prof. Hey led the UK's e-Science Programme from 2001 to 2005. He later joined Microsoft as corporate vice-president of technical computing before becoming corporate vice president of external research, and eventually corporate vice president of Microsoft Research Connections.